Monthly Archives: September 2014

A Dream home made into reality

In this case we see that a home really can be a box or rather two large rectangular sections attached together and mounted above two concrete piers. The house is framed with steel and wrapped with a wood exterior.

 

HullHouse1This is to really give off a boat vibe, as this home design was inspired by the look of a boat. Considering this home was inspired by the look of a boat where would be a better area for it to be situated then near the ocean? The home hovers right over the ocean where waves can crash into the concrete that is holding up the building.

If you thought this wasn’t impressive enough other than seeing the view from the outside the interior is designed perfectly to see the outdoors. There are wall sized windows pointing towards the ocean so that you can sit relaxed and watch the ocean and the wave’s crash against the rocks and below the home.

Hullhouse2

 

Also as this is a home it is suitable for living as the interior is designed with areas for a bedroom as well as other facilities like a bathroom and kitchen. This home despite being located near crashing waves and hovering over rocks is surprisingly inviting. The interior was designed to enhance the outdoors as the entire building was made to look out into the ocean like binoculars the interiors, also revolves around the boat and ocean theme.



Hullhouse3The home not only brightens up the day of the person inside it also illuminates the beachfront at night. With the amount of lights installed inside and with the positioning of the home the two wooden “hulls” appear as lanterns lighting up the water.

Hullhouse4As always when constructing a project this massive it’s important to let the professionals do the job, as constructing a project without professional help can end up costing you more money if there are damages as well as take longer and probably not let it end up the way you wanted it to. The final important thought to remember is that a dream home doesn’t have to stay a dream home and can be made into a reality.
Written By: Vithusan Jeyabalasingam 

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10 Tips for Turning a First Home Into an Income Property

For the past ten years, Scott McGillivray, a 30-year-old real estate entrepreneur, has made a living by transforming houses into income properties. The 30-year-old currently manages 18 properties with over 100 tenants, and now he’s coming to HGTV to help a “house poor” generation create legal income suites and help offset their rising mortgage payments.

Whether it’s a 100-year-old Victorian home, a multi-apartment property or a fully renovated unit in a hip urban area, this entrepreneur can do it all. Check out 10 tips we learned from McGillivray by watching the first episode of HGTV’s Income Property:


  1. Make sure it’s worth it
    As McGillivray says, the cost of renovations has to be able to pay itself back within two years rent. Scout out local markets, get a professional opinion, and be sure to watchIncome Property. Because, hey, who doesn’t want to make a couple of bucks on something they need anyway?

  2. Tag team, if you can
    To use a cliché, two heads are better than one, and home-owning is no exception. Getting to your desired final product is a journey, and having a teammate to share frustrations, anxieties and most importantly, costs with is invaluable.

  3. The best way to learn is to go through the experience
    As one homeowner in the show puts it, “you can read as many books as you want, but you have to experience it.” Every home is unique, and every home will reveal its own problems and potential solutions.

  4. Whatever you budget, add 25 per cent
    When renovating your space, despite what a professionally quoted budget says, add 25 per cent, just in case. If you don’t go over, nothing lost. But if you do, at least you were expecting it.

  5. Houses are like onions
    The more layers you peel back, especially while demolishing, the more problems you’re going to find. Count on hidden gems like mould, live wires and any other hidden costs, just in case.

  6. Consider all the options
    If you have a three-story plus basement house, why just rent out only the basement? As we learn in the first episode, doubling the space not only allows you to live mortgage-free by increasing the rent, it also increases the value of the home. But it also may not be the option for you, especially if you plan on expanding a family or you want access to your backyard.

  7. Make sure the space is livable
    If the kitchen has zero counter space and the bedroom can only fit a bed, not only is it going to be hard to find someone to rent out your unit, but think of the types of people who might be wanting to rent out your unit.

  8. Don’t skimp on the drywall, especially on the ceiling
    Not only do you want a fire barrier between you and your new housemates, you might be thankful for a little bit of sound-proofing in the long run.

  9. Start on the outside
    A separate entrance is key when renting out a basement, especially if you don’t want to mingle too much with your new lessees. And you might want to make sure there are no potential lawsuits hanging around — such as slippery stairs or rotting wood.

  10. Don’t turn your house into a home… right away
    If a long-term investment is what you seek, turning your space into a home right off the bat isn’t going to help pay those accumulating bills. Your No. 1 priority should be making your home into an income source, or at least a manageable entity.

Posted By: Jake Fortinsky

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THIS BLOG claims no credit for any images posted on this site unless otherwise noted. Images and content on this blog are copyright to its respectful owners. If there is an image appearing on this blog that belongs to you and do not wish for it appear on this site, please E-mail (info@trocanada.com) with a link to said image and it will be promptly removed.